All posts tagged: truth

Satya as a Form of Grace

Satya is one of the most complicated of the yogic ethical principles.  It is translated as “truth” in many texts, but truth is, in and of itself, a construct of culture.  For example, I may hold as “truth” in my Quaker faith that everyone has the light of God in them (no matter behavior or evidence that seems to prove otherwise), while others may have very different ways of looking at the concept of Holy Spirit or the concept of the divine.  Am I telling the truth when I pray in this way?  Are the other understandings of the relationship between humans and the divine the NOT-truth?  And, how can we relate this use of the word “truth” when describing a commitment of faith to asking a person we work with if they are the ones who ate our yogurt in the shared refrigerator?  In the case of the yogurt, it could be seen that this is completely different.  Our colleague either ate our yogurt or they didn’t.  But, maybe when they answer us it …

What Does Matrika Mean?

What does ‘Matrika’ Mean? What’s In a Name? There are many different styles of yoga and new traditions are being created each and every day. If you are new to yoga, all of the different names for yoga classes, different studios and teachers can seem confusing at worst and unclear at best. If you have practiced yoga for some time, you may only be familiar with one style or perhaps you have a teacher or studio that you loved in a different city and can’t seem to find what you are looking for. As we grow in our practice and as the circumstances of our lifestyle and our bodily realities shift and change, our yoga practice changes. Therefore, the best advice that I would give anyone is to be open to new styles and new teachers and trying new things—-you never know when you might find the perfect fit for where you are right now. If you take a yoga class that you don’t like or with a teacher you weren’t particularly fond of, try …

Space in Hiding

This morning I was drawn to one of my favorite books that I have never actually finished.  This book is about a personal spiritual and geographical adventure, but also about pilgrimage and finding personal truth in something as slippery as space.  In The Heart of the World, Ian Baker introduces (at least, it was new to me!) the Tibetan Buddhist concept of beyul, or hidden lands.  The idea is that through spiritual practices and physical preparations, places on earth that were not immediately open to us, become places we can travel.  These mystical sanctuaries are “hidden” until they are revealed. The implications are so significant, that I fear absolute failure in any attempt I might make to illuminate them through the written word.  But, if you need a mind bending and inspiring book to read this season as the leaves change color and life seems to cycle-down, I recommend this one.  Even if you don’t finish, it will change the way you think about space forever. Posted by Sharon Rudyk, owner and director of YOGA …