All posts tagged: space

Forward Folds and Bending Over Backwards in Nature

The number one thing that adults say when I tell them that I am a yoga teacher is: “Oh, I can’t do yoga!  I’m so inflexible and I can’t even get close to touching my toes.” For about twenty-years now, I have tried every socially acceptable way possible at these moments to try to explain that yoga isn’t about being flexible, that anyone and everyone can benefit, that one may or may not become more flexible through yoga, that flexibility is, truly….besides the point entirely.  As soon as I start talking, I see the recipient’s eyes glaze over.  They are no longer paying attention to me, mostly because they only asked what I did for a living as a social pleasantry in the first place. Now, they are filled with regret for having ever made eye contact in the first place.  I can almost see the thoughts of escape to the cheese platter or, even better, the bar, cross their mind. A couple weeks ago I was on a walk with a friend when t …

Space in Hiding

This morning I was drawn to one of my favorite books that I have never actually finished.  This book is about a personal spiritual and geographical adventure, but also about pilgrimage and finding personal truth in something as slippery as space.  In The Heart of the World, Ian Baker introduces (at least, it was new to me!) the Tibetan Buddhist concept of beyul, or hidden lands.  The idea is that through spiritual practices and physical preparations, places on earth that were not immediately open to us, become places we can travel.  These mystical sanctuaries are “hidden” until they are revealed. The implications are so significant, that I fear absolute failure in any attempt I might make to illuminate them through the written word.  But, if you need a mind bending and inspiring book to read this season as the leaves change color and life seems to cycle-down, I recommend this one.  Even if you don’t finish, it will change the way you think about space forever. Posted by Sharon Rudyk, owner and director of YOGA …

Gesture of Awareness

I have recently become acquainted with the most fascinating and inspiring book, Gesture of Awareness: A Radical Approach to Time, Space, and Movement.  The book is authored by Charles Genoud (2006) and published by Wisdom Publications. The dedication of the book reads “It is over.”  which gives a strong hint to the reader that their experience with time is about to get shook-up and turned on its head.  How can it be over when the reader has just begun? “But how can it be over before anything has started?  And can anything really start?  To start something     implies it will go on, will end.  That is the movement of time.  But is there truth in this sense of movement?  To start something is to step into time, and to step into time is to step out from reality into an   insubstantial world of images, of language.  Therefore, to start, to go on, to be over–may all be equally illusory. (3).” I have been finding this radical approach to time to be helpful both in …