All posts tagged: reading

Hiding in Public

It is only recently that I have learned that I am an introvert.  More precisely, I am an extroverted introvert.  I don’t not like being around other people and do not have trouble in crowds or social situations.  I can introduce myself to strangers and make friends with relative ease.  But, being with other people doesn’t nourish me the way that being alone is soothing and refreshing.  I don’t just LIKE being by myself……I NEED to be by myself, probably a lot more than many other people do.  I have no fear of loneliness as the idea of being all by myself is rather enticing.  But, as an extroverted introvert (or is it introverted extrovert?), my favorite place to be all by myself is the library.  It’s how I go and be all alone with others.  Perhaps it is because I grew up in an urban environment, but I like to have people “around”, but not engaging with them.  Combine being alone in public with unlimited access to books?  Heaven.  Perfection!  And so,  every Tuesday …

On the Dark Side of Good

My dear readers, I have suggested in the past that a truly “good read” can’t be all that serious, but I have just read, perhaps, one of the finest books I have ever read and it is, by all definition, a truly dark book.  But, since I feel so strongly that it is a beautiful piece of literature that, as dark as it is, ultimately affirms life, so I’m going to recommend it as a “Good Read” anyway.   You have been warned! Title: Stone Upon Stone Author: Wieslaw Mysliwski Translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston Reviews can be found here. This next recommendation is dark, but the tone of the writing is comedic and it does not feel as heavy as Stone Upon Stone (no pun intended).  But, it also stretches the limits of darkness allowable for a truly “good read” and I don’t recommend it for anyone who is sad or currently in a therapeutic process of any sort.  No reason to torture yourself, even for a truly excellent novel. Title: The Hottest …

Space in Hiding

This morning I was drawn to one of my favorite books that I have never actually finished.  This book is about a personal spiritual and geographical adventure, but also about pilgrimage and finding personal truth in something as slippery as space.  In The Heart of the World, Ian Baker introduces (at least, it was new to me!) the Tibetan Buddhist concept of beyul, or hidden lands.  The idea is that through spiritual practices and physical preparations, places on earth that were not immediately open to us, become places we can travel.  These mystical sanctuaries are “hidden” until they are revealed. The implications are so significant, that I fear absolute failure in any attempt I might make to illuminate them through the written word.  But, if you need a mind bending and inspiring book to read this season as the leaves change color and life seems to cycle-down, I recommend this one.  Even if you don’t finish, it will change the way you think about space forever. Posted by Sharon Rudyk, owner and director of YOGA …

You’re a Star…..Literally.

In my estimation,  of the greatest joys of being a parent is that you get to reconnect with children’s literature.  Sure, there are nights when I’m quite sure that if I ever even accidentally trip over a Dr. Seuss book again that I might immediately burst into flames–never mind READ it again.  For the most part, I am delighted by the beautiful illustrations, the kind and meaningful tone and the idea that there is such great potential in this life. Recently, we checked out The Greatest Intergalactic Guide to Space Ever by the Brainwaves from our local library.  The illustrations by Lisa Swerling and Ralph Lazar are imaginative and, quite frankly, hilarious.  The book is a brilliant collection of facts about space and it is everything that I had hoped my college course on astronomy would be, but without the physics. Then, on page 25, I read something that awed me and put me in touch with a sense of wonder and wonderment that made me kiss my sleeping blondie on his little head before …

Guide for the Advanced Soul

I once had a roommate in New York that I never met.  It’s a sort of complicated story and one that wouldn’t be all that interesting to repeat.  Suffice to say, I am now the owner of two of his left behind belongings that have changed my life.  One, is a pink crystal ball.  Seriously.  And, fortunately for you patient reader, not the topic of this essay! The second, is a small book titled, A Guide for the Advanced Soul: A Book of Insight.  It is created and handwritten by Susan Hayward and published by Little, Brown and Company in 1984.  The intention for the book is that you use it as a guide when you have a problem or need guidance to help you make your decision.  After a brief period of meditation, you put forward your request to the universe and randomly open the book.  The guide’s instructions indicate that, “The first words you read will tell you what you most need to hear.” Even the instructions are of interest to me.  They are …