All posts tagged: Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Yoga Classes

Tibetan Yoga on Wednesday Mornings 10:00 am In my personal practice of yoga, in the past five-years, I have started to bring more and more of my meditation into my yoga and more of my yoga into my meditation.  Essentially, it is now one practice.  This is possible because the type of somatic meditation that I practice (somatic meaning “of the body”) is rooted in Vajrayana Buddhism.  This is one of the major schools of Buddhist practice and thought that is based on the idea that we all already possess Buddha-nature in ourselves and that enlightenment is just the recognition of our true nature.  The practice has more to do with learning techniques that access much more than the physical body and bring us into a state of open awareness to things as they are.  It is in this “space” where all potential and opportunity exists.  We don’t need to make anything, improve on anything, get more flexible or strong or change anything.  Rather, we use our tools of somatic awareness to enter into an …

Practice Notes: Rainbow Body

Each week, I teach a mindful yoga class on Tuesday nights at Mookshi Wellness Center.  Recently, I have adapted a new preparation technique for teaching my classes and find the foundation theme for my class through daily prayer and meditation.  I have always been guided to teach from the wisdom of my practice as I was encouraged to do so by my compassionate and insightful teacher and mentor, Jill Satterfield.  But, for the past two-months I have been randomly choosing a sutra from Lorin Roche’s beautiful translation and commentary of the Vijnana Bhairava Tantra, The Radiance Sutras, and allowing the message of that particular sutra guide my choice of breathing, asana and visualization practices. This past spring I took a truly amazing distance learning course with Janet Conner called “Soul Vows” (also the title of her newest book, which is phenomenal) and was able to do so through a generous full scholarship that she offered to me.  The truth is that I had a hard time with the course.  I still haven’t come up with my soul …

Space in Hiding

This morning I was drawn to one of my favorite books that I have never actually finished.  This book is about a personal spiritual and geographical adventure, but also about pilgrimage and finding personal truth in something as slippery as space.  In The Heart of the World, Ian Baker introduces (at least, it was new to me!) the Tibetan Buddhist concept of beyul, or hidden lands.  The idea is that through spiritual practices and physical preparations, places on earth that were not immediately open to us, become places we can travel.  These mystical sanctuaries are “hidden” until they are revealed. The implications are so significant, that I fear absolute failure in any attempt I might make to illuminate them through the written word.  But, if you need a mind bending and inspiring book to read this season as the leaves change color and life seems to cycle-down, I recommend this one.  Even if you don’t finish, it will change the way you think about space forever. Posted by Sharon Rudyk, owner and director of YOGA …