All posts tagged: satya

Satya as a Form of Grace

Satya is one of the most complicated of the yogic ethical principles.  It is translated as “truth” in many texts, but truth is, in and of itself, a construct of culture.  For example, I may hold as “truth” in my Quaker faith that everyone has the light of God in them (no matter behavior or evidence that seems to prove otherwise), while others may have very different ways of looking at the concept of Holy Spirit or the concept of the divine.  Am I telling the truth when I pray in this way?  Are the other understandings of the relationship between humans and the divine the NOT-truth?  And, how can we relate this use of the word “truth” when describing a commitment of faith to asking a person we work with if they are the ones who ate our yogurt in the shared refrigerator?  In the case of the yogurt, it could be seen that this is completely different.  Our colleague either ate our yogurt or they didn’t.  But, maybe when they answer us it …

What Does Matrika Mean?

What does ‘Matrika’ Mean? What’s In a Name? There are many different styles of yoga and new traditions are being created each and every day. If you are new to yoga, all of the different names for yoga classes, different studios and teachers can seem confusing at worst and unclear at best. If you have practiced yoga for some time, you may only be familiar with one style or perhaps you have a teacher or studio that you loved in a different city and can’t seem to find what you are looking for. As we grow in our practice and as the circumstances of our lifestyle and our bodily realities shift and change, our yoga practice changes. Therefore, the best advice that I would give anyone is to be open to new styles and new teachers and trying new things—-you never know when you might find the perfect fit for where you are right now. If you take a yoga class that you don’t like or with a teacher you weren’t particularly fond of, try …

Desire & Deserve

I was recently supervising my preschooler in the tub and, while he engaged in an imaginary battle between a Thomas the Tank Engine bath squirter and a Fisher Price fisherman, decided to pick up my shampoo bottle and read the text.  This text informed me that, by using this particular product, I would obtain results that would give me the hair that I both desired and deserved. The desired part, I could identify with.  Of course, I desire healthy, shiny, full, fresh smelling and bouncy hair with appropriate fullness.  I certainly desire to protect my hair from anything that might cause damage.  This may be a whole lot of hope to place in dead skin cells, but I could not deny as I read the back of that bottle that, yes, I desired these things.  Admittedly, I also made my purchase with some hope that using this particular product would, in fact, help me obtain a head of hair that had just this list of delicious qualities.  For those of you who know me, I …

Community

Recently, I spent some time reviewing the text of this website and found myself drawn to my description of Yoga Matrika as a community-based yoga studio.   What exactly do I mean by this and what do I wish to communicate about the studio when I describe it in this way?  First, it’s a community-based studio because it has pedestrian access.  It is within walking distance for the greater Squirrel Hill community and anyone who takes busses through the main retail area on Murray and Forbes.  This fact means that many of the faces around the studio are faces that you’ve seen before—at Giant Eagle, at your synagogue and around your local playground.  You may not know the other students at Yoga Matrika, but you share community space and all of our actions around and outside of the studio impact one another—the way we garden, shovel our sidewalks, vote, participate in schools and community activism, etc.  Second, it’s a community-based studio because it is an intimate space.  This is not a studio where you can remain …